Jewelry

In a former life (i.e. during my undergraduate career) I took a Jewelry and Metalsmithing class just for fun, and found that I had a real passion for it. So much so that I took a few more classes in it, as well as becoming an after-hours lab supervisor (basically I had a key to the lab and was in charge of safety during some after-hours times). I even contemplated getting a minor in Jewelry and Metalsmithing, but that didn't work out for various reasons.

I made quite a few pieces, but unfortunately only thought to photograph a few of them. These photographs and description text used to be on a dedicated blog, but I kept forgetting the url for it, and besides which now I have webspace on which to put them! So here you go, enjoy!


Gold Ring

Not math related, but pretty and my first gold piece. Gold band, bezel set moissonites with a prong set emerald in the middle (it looks a little blue in the picture, I think)

Gold Ring
Gold Ring

Octopus

Again not math related, but possibly my favorite piece. This turned out to be a very heavy piece, and in theory it was meant to be worn during a dinner party of some sort, where you could rest your hand on the table and have the ring splayed and rested on your hand. The last image is a picture of the ring in wax form, before I had cast it into silver. I still like how the color scheme worked out (the colors are an artifact of the types of wax used).

Octopus
Octopus
Octopus in wax form

DNA Helix

This is, in my opinion, my best technical piece. That is, I had some pretty good techniques in it, and pulled each of them off pretty well. It is a helix in which one strand is copper and the other brass; and both metals were given a layer of patina. The metals were soldered together completely at their edges, side-by-side, which I think creates a nice effect. The sharp points were curled and smoothed, and the entire thing turned out to be very light, flexible, and just looked good. It is out there in the world somewhere.

DNA Helix

4-Cube

This was a fun math piece. There is a way to represent a (3-dimensional) cube laid out flat on a piece of paper (i.e. planarly). If you take two copies of this 3-cube, and put them above each other and connect corresponding vertices then you will technically have a 3-dimensional model of a 4-dimensional cube (a 4-cube, or hypercube).
Part of the reason I made this piece was in my exploration of techniques - in this case the technique was making a box (which is more difficult than it sounds). One of the tops of the box was made up of four pieces- the middle is copper, two opposing wings are a mokume blend of silver and copper, and the last two are patina'd copper, and brass. I made the rest of the sides, and the base, out of copper, so in an effort to represent the other edges of the 4-cube I brushed strokes of patina to look like edges. This did not turn out as well as I hoped, and when I invent a time machine I will go back in time and help myself create more professional looking edges. I gave this to one of my professors, and he kept it on his desk for a few years... I wonder where it is now!

4-cube
4-cube

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